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2021 Family Violence Prevention and Services Act American Rescue Plan (FVPSA ARP) Supplemental COVID-19 Testing, Vaccine Access, Mobile Health Units Access Funds

The deadline for submissions is by 5pm EST on February 14, 2023.

The Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) provides the primary federal funding stream dedicated to the support of emergency shelter and supportive services for victims of domestic violence and their dependents. FVPSA is located in the Family & Youth Services Bureau (FYSB), a division of the Administration on Children, Youth and Families in the Administration for Children & Families. First authorized as part of the Child Abuse Amendments of 1984 (P.L.98-457), FVPSA has been amended eight times. It was most recently reauthorized in December 2010 for five years by the CAPTA Reauthorization Act of 2010(42 U.S.C. §§ 10401 – 10414).

OCJS AND THE FVPSA AMERICAN RESCUE PLAN SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING PROGRAM

The Ohio Office of Criminal Justice Services (OCJS) is a division of the Ohio Department of Public Safety. By statute, OCJS is the lead justice planning and assistance office for the state, administering millions of dollars in state and federal criminal justice funding every year. OCJS also evaluates programs and develops technology, training, and products for criminal justice professionals and communities.

OCJS has been designated by Governor Mike DeWine to administer the FY 2021 Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) funds, therefore the Family & Youth Services Bureau (FYSB), a division of the Administration on Children, Youth and Families in the Administration for Children & Families designated OCJS as the state administering agency for the FVPSA American Rescue Plan (ARP) Supplemental Funding Program.

FEDERAL FVPSA PROGRAM PURPOSE

The purpose of the federal FVPSA Program is to support the establishment, maintenance, and expansion of programs and projects:

  1. to prevent incidents of family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence;
  2. to provide immediate shelter, supportive services, and access to community-based programs for victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, and their dependents; and
  3. to provide specialized services for children exposed to family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, underserved populations, and victims who are members of racial and ethnic minority populations.

The purpose of this supplemental funding is to prevent, prepare for, and respond to the COVID-19 virus with an intentional focus of increasing access to COVID-19 testing, vaccines, and mobile health units to mitigate the spread of this virus and increase supports for domestic violence survivors and their dependents. Within these parameters, states, territories, and tribal grant recipients have flexibility to determine which services best support the needs of children and families experiencing family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence.

The implementation of this supplemental funding aligns with the FVPSA definition for supportive services. Supportive services is defined as services for adult and youth victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, and their dependents that are designed to meet the needs of such victims and their dependents for short-term, transitional, or long-term safety and recovery. Supportive services include, but are not limited to: direct and/or referral-based advocacy on behalf of victims and their dependents, counseling, case management, employment services, referrals, transportation services, legal advocacy or assistance, child care services, health, behavioral health and preventive health services, culturally and linguistically appropriate services, and other services that assist victims or their dependents in recovering from the effects of the violence. To the extent not already described in this definition, supportive services also include but are not limited to other services identified in FVPSA at 42 U.S.C. 10408(b)(1)(A)-(H). Supportive services may be directly provided by recipients and/or by providing advocacy or referrals to assist victims in accessing such services (45 CFR § 1370.2).

Please also note that the implementation of this supplemental funding also aligns with medical advocacy and other services in FVPSA at 42 U.S.C. 10408(b)(1)(A)-(H). Specification, FVPSA Section 308 includes the following for allowable activities as supportive services: (iii) medical advocacy, including provision of referrals for appropriate health care services (including mental health, alcohol, and drug abuse treatment).

ELIGIBLE APPLICANTS

Eligible subrecipients include:1

Distribution of FVPSA ARP funds:

Pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 10407(a)(2)(B)(iii), the state will emphasize the support of effective community-based projects that are carried out by nonprofit, private organizations and that do the following:

  • have the operation of shelters for victims of family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence, and their dependents as their primary purpose; or
  • provide counseling, advocacy, and self-help services to victims of family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence, and their dependents.2

BIDDERS TRAINING

A voluntary Bidders Training webinar will take place January 31, 2023 at 10am. The training will provide information helpful for both the application preparation and review process. Please visit https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4675667027548815967 to complete the registration.

For any additional questions contact OCJS at 614.466.7782 or email Katie Fenwick at KLFenwick@dps.ohio.gov.

ALLOWABLE USE OF FUNDS

  • COVID-19 Testing
  • COVID-19 Vaccine Access
  • Mobile Health Units Access (Excludes vehicle purchases and leases)
  • Workforce Expansions, Capacity Building, and Supports
    • Such expenses may include:
      • Hiring bonuses and retention payments,
      • Childcare,
      • Transportation subsidies, and
      • Other fringe or personal benefits authorized by HHS regulations (45 CFR part 75).

Refer to Appendix A for Allowable Use of Funds Guidance.


1The terms Grantee/Recipient and Subgrantee/Subrecipient are used interchangeably throughout this document.

2Distribution of FVPSA grant funds: 1) not less than 70 percent of the funds distributed by a State to sub-recipients shall be distributed to entities for
the primary purpose of providing immediate shelter and supportive services to adult and youth victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, and their dependents, 2) not less than 25 percent of the funds distributed by a State to subgrantees/recipients shall be distributed to entities for the purpose of providing supportive services and prevention services.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

  • Safe voluntary access to COVID-19 testing, vaccines, and mobile health services.
  • Reduced burden for DV programs that do not have resources and staff to support COVID-19 mitigation.
  • Meaningful partnerships between DV programs and health care providers.
  • Increased usage of mobile health units and mobile advocacy services for survivors.
  • Increased access to health and behavioral health supports for survivors and children.
  • Enhanced supportive services for survivors that are safe and accessible where they need them most.

WHAT TO EXPECT

Technical Assistance. For technical assistance on the narrative and budget pieces of the FVPSA ARP application, email Katie Fenwick at KLFenwick@dps.ohio.gov.

For technical assistance with the Online Grants Management System, please contact your grant coordinator by email. You can find your OCJS Regional Contact here: Grants Administration Contact. Emails are recommended for a quicker response.

Review. OCJS staff will review proposals and will ensure that project budget costs are allowable and directly relate to the program. The OCJS Executive Director makes final funding recommendations and the Director of the Ohio Department of Public Safety approves them.

AWARD NOTIFICATIONS AND EXPECTATIONS

Projects will be notified and required to complete all forms and pre-award conditions electronically through the Online Grants Management System. Forms and assurances included with pre-award conditions include, but are not limited to:

  • Equal Employment Opportunity Certification Form
  • Civil Rights and EEOP Questions Part 1 Form
  • Standard Assurances Form
  • Special Conditions Form
  • Fidelity/Surety Bond (Note: only applicable for non-profit applicants)
  • Proof of Tax-Exempt Status (Note: only applicable for non-profit applicants)
  • Registration in the System for Award Management (www.sam.gov/www.sam.gov/SAM/).

In addition to the above requirements and this Request for Proposal, all subrecipients are bound by the Federal Subgrant Conditions Handbook. Please note: the FVPSA ARP grant is a reimbursement grant. Projects will submit Quarterly Subgrant Reports through the online grants management system to request reimbursement for grant expenses. Reimbursements are contingent on meeting the requirements of the grant including but not limited to performance reporting requirements as described in the Pre-Award Conditions.

LENGTH OF FUNDING

Applicants may apply for 18 months of funding, operating from July 1, 2023 to September 30, 2024.

FISCAL CONSIDERATIONS

  • There is no funding cap, however applicants are expected to submit funding requests that reflect realistic and allowable project costs that can be expended during the July 1, 2023 to September 30, 2024 project period. The number of applications received and the availability of funds are a few of the factors that influence the number and size of awards.
  • All budget items must be related to COVID-19 prevention, preparation and response.
  • There is not a match requirement for this award. Please leave this section of the budget blank
  • Lodging and meal per diem rates cannot exceed the rates set by the federal Government Services Administration. The rates can be found at https://www.gsa.gov/travel/plan-book/per-diem-rates
  • Mileage rates cannot exceed the rates set by Ohio Budget Management. These rate can be found at https://obm.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/obm/areas-of-interest/agency-overview/obm-travel-rule/obm-travel-rule
  • OCJS Fiscal Definitions
  • External Audit or Financial Report–applicants are required to upload a copy of the organization’s most recent external audit or most recent financial report to the Attachment Upload section of the application. This allows OCJS to ensure requirements are met for 2 C.F.R. § 200.331(f). Single Audit Act Amendment of 1996, and the OMB Circular A-133.

Audit Submission Requirements

OCJS may choose not to approve an applicant for an award if the applicant:

  • Does not submit, or provide upon request, an annual audit in accordance with the Single Audit Act Amendments of 1996 (pdf), OMB Circular A-133, the OMB Circular Compliance Supplement and Government Auditing Standards;
  • Does not submit an annual financial review completed by a Certified Public Accountant (if the organization has been in business less than two years or receives less that $750,000 annually in federal funding); or
  • Has an overdue audit report, an open audit report that has not been responded to, or if the applicant has not tried to resolve the issues identified in the audit.

POST AWARD REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

All FVPSA ARP subrecipients are required to submit progress reports. OCJS will provide updated reporting requirements during the pre-award conditions process.

CLIENT CONFIDENTIALITY

To ensure the safety of adult, youth, and child victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, and their families, FVPSA-funded programs must establish and implement policies and protocols for maintaining the confidentiality of records pertaining to any individual provided domestic violence services. Consequently, when providing statistical data on program activities and program services, individual identifiers of client records will not be used by the State or other FVPSA grantees or subgrantees (Section 10406(c)(5)).

In the annual grantee Performance Progress Report (PPR), States and subgrantees must collect unduplicated data from each program rather than unduplicated data across programs or statewide. No client-level data should be shared with a third party, regardless of encryption, hashing, or other data security measures, without a written, time-limited release as described in section 10406(c)(5). The address or location of any FVPSA-supported shelter facility shall not be made public except with written authorization of the person or persons responsible for the operation of such shelter (42 U.S.C. § 10406(c)(5)(H)) and the confidentiality of records pertaining to any individual provided domestic violence services by any FVPSA-supported program will be strictly maintained.

VOLUNTARY SERVICES

Receipt of supportive services under FVPSA will be voluntary. No condition will be applied for the receipt of emergency shelter as described in Section 10408(d)(2)).

FEDERAL DEFINITIONS

  • Dating Violence: Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim and where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of the following factors: The length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.
    • Includes physical, sexual, psychological, emotional violence, financial abuse within a dating relationship, including stalking.
    • Covers in person or online abuse or other forms of manipulation occurring between current/former dating partners regardless of actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity.
  • Domestic Violence3: Felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction.
    • Includes criminal or noncriminal acts constituting intimidation, control, coercion and coercive control, harassment, emotional and psychological abuse, expressive and psychological abuse and behavior, expressive and psychological aggression, financial abuse, harassment, tormenting behavior, disturbing or alarming behavior, and additional acts.
  • Family Violence: Any act or threatened act of violence, including any forceful detention of an individual, that results or threatens to result in physical injury and is committed by a person against another individual, to whom such person is related by blood or marriage, or is or was otherwise legally related, or is or was lawfully residing.
  • Shelter: The provision of temporary refuge in conjunction with supportive services in compliance with applicable State or Tribal law or regulations governing the provision, on a regular basis, of shelter, safe homes, meals, and supportive services to victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, and their dependents.
    • Includes emergency and immediate shelter, which may include housing provision, rental subsidies, temporary refuge, or lodging in properties that could be individual units for families and individuals (such as apartments) in multiple locations around a local jurisdiction, or State.
    • Temporary refuge includes a residential service, including shelter and off-site services such as hotel or motel vouchers or individual dwellings, which are not transitional or permanent housing, but must also provide comprehensive supportive services.
    • The mere act of making a referral to shelter or housing shall not itself be considered provision of shelter.
  • Supportive Services: Services for adult and youth victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, and their dependents that are designed to meet the needs of such victims and their dependents for short-term, transitional, or long-term safety and recovery.
    • Supportive services include, but are not limited to: Direct and/or referral-based advocacy on behalf of victims and their dependents, counseling, case management, employment services, referrals, transportation services, legal advocacy or assistance, child care services, health, behavioral health and preventive health services, culturally and linguistically appropriate services, and other services that assist victims or their dependents in recovering from the effects of the violence.

3Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is another term for Domestic Violence. Funds awarded through OCJS should not be used exclusively for victims/survivors of IPV and should be used to include providing services for victims/survivors of Family Violence.

PROPOSAL COMPONENTS CHECKLIST

ALL components within each section of the RFP must be addressed and clearly described. Use the following as a checklist to ensure all required components are addressed. Read the entire FY 2021 Supplemental COVID-19 Testing, Vaccine Access, Mobile Health Units Access Funds RFP before completing and submitting proposals.

  • Title Page
  • Narrative
  • Organization Capacity
  • Attachment Upload
    • External Audit or Financial Report (All Applicants)
  • Executive Summary
  • Budget

FORMAT AND SUBMISSION

  • Applications are submitted online through the OCJS Online Grants Management System. New applicants must first register in the online system. Applicants that have previously used the system may use their existing account. It is recommended that new applicants register at least two weeks prior to the application deadline to ensure access to the online application.
  • Deadline for submission is by 5 p.m. EST February 14, 2023. OCJS will not review late applications or consider them for funding.

    IMPORTANT: Applications must be in the APPLICATION SUBMITTED STATUS in the OCJS Grants Management System to be considered for funding.

For technical assistance on application components please email Katie Fenwick at KLFenwick@dps.ohio.gov. For assistance with the Online Grants Management System please contact your OCJS Grant Coordinator. Emails are recommended for a quicker response.

FVPSA ARP SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING PROGRAM PROPOSAL NARRATIVE

Responses must clearly align with COVID-19 prevention, preparation and response with an intentional focus of increasing access to COVID-19 testing, vaccines, and mobile health units to mitigate the spread of this virus and increase supports for domestic violence survivors and their dependents. Applications will be evaluated on how clearly the following items have been responded to within the narrative.

  • Provide local data/statistics that show how the community/population you serve has been impacted by Covid-19. Responses should include:
    • Population size, location, geography
    • Population composition in terms of race, ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status, and other important demographic information
    • Calls for service from January1, 2021–December31,2021(immediate shelter and/or related supportive services)
    • Number of people served from January 1, 2021 – December 31, 2021(immediate shelter and/or related supportive services)
    • Number of people who requested services but were turned away from January 1, 2021 – December 31, 2021 (explain why)
    • A description of your agency’s practice for serving people from other counties.
  • Provide information to explain how your agency has been impacted by COVID-19.
  • Explain why other resources in the community are not sufficient to address the problem you are experiencing.
  • Describe what you are requesting funding for, and how your request is related to COVID-19 prevention, preparation, or response with the intentional focus of increasing access and supports for domestic violence survivors and their dependents. Refer to page 4 Allowable Use of Funds and Appendix A.
  • Who on your staff will be responsible for overseeing the project? Responses should include staff managing the proposed project activities and staff implementing project activities. If staff have not been hired describe positions and roles within the project.
  • Discuss how/whether you have worked with local/state/federal health departments, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), or other entities such as the Ohio Domestic Violence Network (ODVN) in developing Covid-19 related policies and practices. If you have not, please explain why.

ORGANIZATION CAPACITY

Applicants should provide a comprehensive discussion of the history and accomplishments of the organization responsible for implementing the project. Identify any key staff that will be involved in the project, including the project director and other individuals who will be responsible for administering the grant and implementing the program.

Applications will be evaluated on how clearly the following items have been responded to within the narrative.

  • Describe the mission of the agency that will serve as the subgrantee and/or implementing agency.
  • Describe the capacity of the subgrantee and implementing agency’s ability to administer grants of similar size and scope.
    • Applicants should identify/name the specific grant programs and funding amounts that have been administered.
  • Clearly describe adequate resources available (i.e. personnel/staff, infrastructure to support additional program, computers, software, etc.) to implement the project as proposed.
  • Clearly identify key staff, including any volunteers and/or contracted staff that will be participating in the proposed project.
    • Include a description of qualifications, experience, education and training that support the role they will hold on the proposed project.
    • Special attention should be given to those personnel who are identified in the budget
    • Include a description of how the implementing agency works with contracted staff, including interpreter services, to maintain confidentiality of clients.
  • Discuss how successful completion of the project is realistic given the key staff implementing the project.
    • In cases where positions have not been filled, the applicant should clearly describe a reasonable approach and criteria to hire experienced and qualified staff.

Applicants should describe their organizational, staff capacity, and developmental efforts surrounding issues of cultural competency and humility.

Applications will be evaluated on how clearly the following items have been responded to within the narrative.

  • Describe how issues of cultural competency and humility, outreach, and services have been translated into planning for the particular project or program reflecting the racial make-up of the board, staff, volunteers, and victims served.
  • Explain the staff recruitment process and describe staff retention techniques.
  • Discuss how the organization addresses anti-oppression in their mission statement and requires staff to attend training on issues of anti-oppression and privilege. Responses should include the following:
    • Identify and describe the types of trainings that occur.
    • Describe why specific trainings are selected.
    • Describe who will conduct the trainings and how often they occur.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Executive Summary serves as a concise and accurate description of the proposed project and should not introduce new information. The information provided should serve as a summarized version of the overall application narrative.

Purpose Statement

The purpose statement should be clear and concise. It describes what the applicant is going to do, the population that is going to be served, how it will be accomplished and why it is important. Information provided within the purpose statement is reported to the Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act (FFATA) reporting system in response to FFATA legislation.

BUDGET

All budget items must clearly align with COVID-19 prevention, preparation, or response with the intentional focus of increasing access and supports for domestic violence survivors and their dependents. Refer to page 4 Allowable Use of Funds and Appendix A.

Describe any costs associated with implementing the program. The application will be evaluated as to how effectively it:

  • Presents a clear and detailed budget with a narrative that clearly explains and justifies the budget information as it relates to the COVID-19 public health emergency.
  • Justifies the costs of the proposed program and the costs are considered reasonable in view of the types and range of activities to be conducted, the number of participants to be served, and the expected results and benefits.
  • External Audit or Financial Report - upload a copy of your organization’s most recent external audit or most recent financial report to the Attachment Upload section of the application.

Budget Assistance

For information on successful budget completion, please visit Grants Monitoring and Fiscal Compliance to access helpful tools including the Budget Category Overview and Fringe Benefits Summary.

UNALLOWABLE COSTS4

  • Direct payment to survivors;
  • Moving expenses;
  • Construction costs; and
  • Renovation costs.
  • Vehicle purchases and leases.
  • Billboards

Additional descriptions of costs that cannot be supported through this grant program can be accessed at the Unallowable Costs list.


4NOTE: OCJS has provided funding to the Ohio Domestic Violence Network (ODVN) to coordinate hotel/motel needs and therefore applicants should contact ODVN in support of hotel/motel funding requests.

Appendix A - ALLOWABLE USE OF FUNDS GUIDANCE

COVID-19 Testing

The intent of the ARP COVID-19 testing, vaccines, and mobile health units supplemental funding is to assist states, territories, tribes with:

  • Eliminating barriers to COVID-19 testing and supplies for domestic violence shelters, domestic violence programs, culturally specific organizations, tribes, and rural communities;
  • Providing resources for onsite testing for domestic violence shelters, domestic violence programs, culturally specific organizations, tribes, and rural communities;
  • Providing resources and access to rapid COVID-19 testing and supplies for domestic violence shelters, domestic violence programs, culturally specific organizations, tribes, and rural communities;
  • Maintaining and increasing COVID-19 testing efforts for domestic violence survivors and their dependents;
  • Expanding access to testing for tribes, rural communities, racial and ethnic specific communities, limited English proficient (LEP) individuals; and
  • Expanding the range of COVID-19 mitigation activities for domestic violence shelters, domestic violence programs, culturally specific organizations, tribes, and rural communities.

The ARP COVID-19 testing, vaccines, and mobile health units supplemental funding can be used for COVID-19 testing and mitigation-related expenses or to reimburse subrecipients for such expenses. Funding should assist the states, territories, and tribes with expanding testing and mitigation-related activities to best address the needs of the local communities in the service area(s). This includes both direct and indirect costs of COVID-19 testing and mitigation and other related expenses. It is important for states, territories, and tribes to demonstrate that each related expense is directly and reasonably related to the provision of COVID-19 testing or COVID-19 mitigation activities. Each related expense must be reasonable and appropriate given relevant clinical and public health guidance.


COVID-19 testing, mitigation, and related expenses refer to the following:

  • COVID-19 testing includes viral tests to diagnose active COVID-19 infections, antibody tests
    to diagnose past COVID-19 infections, and other tests that the Secretary and/or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) determines appropriate in guidance;
  • Other activities to support COVID-19 testing, including planning for implementation of a COVID-19 testing program, providing interpreters and translated materials for Limited English Proficiency (LEP) individuals, procuring supplies to provide testing, training providers and staff on COVID-19 testing procedures, and reporting data to HHS on COVID- 19 testing activities; or
  • Supplies to provide COVID-19 testing including, but not limited to:
    • Test kits,
    • Swabs,
    • Storage (e.g., refrigerator, freezer, temperature-controlled cabinet),
    • Storage unit door safeguards (e.g., self-closing door hinges, door alarms, door
      locks),
    • Sharps disposal containers, and
    • Temperature monitoring equipment.
  • COVID-19 mitigation includes efforts, activities, and strategies to reduce or prevent local COVID-19 transmission and minimize morbidity and mortality of COVID-19 in sectors such as schools, workplaces, and health care organizations, described in the CDC Community Mitigation Framework. Mitigation activities may include, but are not limited to:
    • Case investigation,
    • Contact tracing,
    • COVID-19screening,
    • COVID-19 testing promotion and confidence building,
    • Community education, health behavior promotion, and referrals to testing, clinical services, and support services.
    • Other activities to support COVID-19 testing and COVID-19 mitigation, including, but not limited to, planning for implementation, providing interpreters and translated materials for LEP individuals maintenance, and/or expansion of a COVID- 19 testing program and/or COVID-19 mitigation program, procuring supplies to provide COVID-19 testing, training providers and staff on COVID-19 testing procedures or COVID-19 mitigation, and reporting data to HHS on COVID-19 testing activities and COVID-19 mitigation activities.

COVID-19 testing and mitigation related-expenses include:

  • Leasing of properties and facilities as necessary to support COVID-19 testing and COVID-19 mitigation;
  • Digital technologies to strengthen the recipient’s core capacity to support the public-health response to COVID-19;
  • Education, rehabilitation, prevention, treatment, and support services for symptoms occurring after recovery from acute COVID-19 infection, including, but not limited to, support for activities of daily living—this includes services for the range of symptoms described as Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC) (i.e., long COVID-19) and providing interpreters and translated materials for LEP individuals maintenance;
  • Items and services furnished to an individual during health care provider office visits (including in-person visits and telehealth visits) in connection with an order for or administration of COVID-19 testing or COVID-19 mitigation activities; and

COVID-19 Vaccine Access

The intent of this supplemental funding is to provide resources for states, territories, and tribes to provide access to COVID-19 vaccines for domestic violence survivors and their dependents including individuals from vulnerable and medically underserved communities. States, territories, and tribes and subrecipients may use funds to address any barriers to vaccines that may be experienced by domestic violence survivors and their dependents.

The supplemental testing funding can be used for supplies and vaccine administration fees for administering the COVID-19 vaccine are outlined below but are not limited to:

  • Administration of a single-dose COVID-19 vaccine,
  • Administration of the first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine requiring a series of two or more doses,
  • Administration of the final dose of a COVID-19 vaccine requiring a series of two or more doses,
  • Administration of recommended booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, and
  • Other activities to support COVID-19 vaccine access or administration, including planning for implementation of a COVID-19 vaccine program, providing interpreters and translated materials for LEP individuals, procuring supplies to provide vaccines, training providers and staff on COVID-19 vaccine procedures, and reporting data on vaccine activities.

Allowable uses of funds may include, but are not limited to, the development and sharing of vaccine related outreach and education materials that are culturally competent or linguistically appropriate, conducting face-to-face outreach as appropriate, making phone calls or other virtual outreach to community members for education and assistance, providing information on the closest vaccine locations, organizing pop-up vaccination sites, making vaccine appointments for individuals, making vaccine reminder calls/texts, and arranging for transportation and childcare assistance to vaccine appointments, as needed, and using interpreters and translated materials for communications with LEP individuals.

The implementation of this supplemental funding is intended to build upon national vaccine education and outreach efforts (including the HHS-funded programs listed under technical assistance resources below), while tailoring approaches to meet the unique needs of the community. Further, this funding will directly support the increase in state, territorial, tribal, and local domestic violence workforce needed to implement this supplemental funding, support access to vaccines, and support coordination with the local health department, health centers or Indian Health Service (IHS) centers that will support addressing any barriers to vaccination for domestic violence survivors and their dependents, including individuals from vulnerable, underserved, rural and racial or ethnic specific communities.

Implementation efforts are expected to be coordinated with the local health department or IHS and may include, but are not limited to: vaccine promotion, information dissemination to survivors about how and where to get vaccinated, coordinating with existing vaccination sites and public health partners to identify isolated and/or vaccine hesitant populations, and increased community and individual patient literacy on benefits of broad vaccination and the safety of vaccines.

Mobile Health Units Access

Mobile health units are an innovative model of health care delivery that could help alleviate health disparities among vulnerable populations and individuals with chronic diseases. The target populations of mobile health units include vulnerable communities such as the homeless, displaced populations, immigrant communities, migrant workers, the under-insured, and children. Historically, these populations and communities are often disconnected from traditional health care settings and require support in accessing health care.

Mobile health units travel to partnering locations and provide services on a recurring basis. For example, mobile health units across the country have successfully partnered with other agencies serving the homeless in the community, such as homeless shelters, faith-based organizations, and food banks. Access to services, engagement in care, and successful utilization of needed services may lead to measurable improvements in health care outcomes among homeless populations of individuals and families.

The FVPSA Program is providing supplemental testing funding to assist states, territories, tribes, domestic violence shelters, domestic violence programs, culturally specific programs, and rural communities with establishing partnerships with health departments, hospitals, and IHS facilities to access mobile health units to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 for domestic violence survivors and their dependents.

Specifically, this supplemental funding is intended to assist states, territories, tribes, shelters, culturally specific organizations, and rural communities with establishing or maintaining contracts with existing mobile health units operated by hospitals, medical clinics, health centers, and public health nonprofit organizations. This funding is intended to provide resources for states, territories, shelters, domestic violence programs, culturally specific organizations, and tribes to have contractual agreements with mobile health units to make regular visits each week to shelter locations, program locations, transitional housing locations, or tribal locations. FVPSA grant recipients are not expected to purchase or operate their own mobile health units.

Partnerships with mobile health units can FVPSA recipients expand access for survivors and their dependents who are in rural parts of their state, or who are members of underserved communities by giving them greater flexibility to bring health care services even closer to survivors who may be isolated from health care.

In terms of access to mobile health units, the International Journal for Equity in Health states that there are an estimated 2,000 mobile clinics operating across the United States (US), serving 7 million people annually, (Attipoe-Dorcoo, S., Delgado, R., Gupta, A., Bennet, J., Oriol, N. E., & Jain, S. H. (2020). Mobile health clinic model in the COVID-19 pandemic: lessons learned and opportunities for policy changes and innovation. International journal for equity in health, 19(1), 73. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12939-020-01175-7).

Mobile health unit is defined “as a unit that is staffed by clinicians working for or on behalf of a health center, hospital, or medical association to provide medical or oral health services at one or more locations” (Yu, S., Hill, C., Ricks, M. L., Bennet, J., & Oriol, N. E. (2017). The scope and impact of mobile health clinics in the United States: a literature review. International journal for equity in health, 16(1), 178. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12939-017-0671-2).

The supplemental testing funds can be used to establish or maintain contracts with mobile health units for regularly scheduled visits or on-call visits to domestic violence programs, culturally specific organizations, tribes, or rural communities to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. Additional allowable uses of funds are outlined below but are not limited to:

  •  COVID-19 testing and vaccine administration;
  • Preventative health services to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 such as vaccines, primary health care, or behavioral health services; and
  • Operational costs or supply costs associated with the operation of mobile health units to partner with domestic violence shelters, programs, tribes, culturally specific organizations, or rural communities.

Workforce Expansions, Capacity Building, and Supports

The supplemental testing funds can be used for COVID-19 workforce related expansions and supports, or to reimburse subrecipients for such costs and for costs that include but are not limited to:

  • Planning for implementation of a COVID-19 testing program, COVID-19 mitigation program, or mobile health units access program;
  • Training providers and staff on COVID-19 testing procedures, COVID-19 mitigation activities, or mobile health unit coordination activities;
  • Hiring culturally-competent and linguistically-appropriate providers and staff to carry out COVID-19 testing procedures, COVID-19 mitigation activities, or mobile health unit coordination activities;
  • Reporting data to HHS on COVID-19 testing activities, COVID-19 mitigation activities, or mobile health unit coordination activities; and
  • Expenses to secure and maintain adequate personnel to carry out COVID-19 testing, COVID-19 mitigation activities, or mobile health unit coordination activities; may be considered allowable costs under applicable HHS regulations if the activity generating the expense and/or the expenses are necessary to secure and maintain adequate personnel. Please review HHS regulations 45 CFR § part 75 “Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for HHS Awards,” Subpart E—Cost Principles, https://www.ecfr.gov/current/title-45/subtitle-A/subchapter-A/part-75/subpart-E?toc=1. These requirements apply to all FVPSA grant recipients, and any subrecipients. All FVPSA grant recipients should thoroughly review these regulations before developing your proposed budget. Such expenses may include:
    • Hiring bonuses and retention payments,
    • Childcare,
    • Transportation subsidies, and
    • Other fringe or personal benefits authorized by HHS regulations (45 CFR part 75).

The purpose of these allowable workforce capacity building expenses are to ensure the continuity of domestic violence services in local communities by allowing supplement funding to be used to sustain an advocacy workforce to prevent, prepare for, and respond to the needs of domestic violence survivors impacted by the COVID-19 public health emergency. A sustainable workforce is needed to operate COVID-19 testing programs, COVID-19 mitigation programs, or mobile health units access programs; and to coordinate partnerships with health departments for each local program to keep families healthy and safe during the COVID-19 public health emergency.

Technical Assistance Resources

FVPSA-funded National Health Resource Center on Domestic Violence has developed two resources that can help states, territories, tribes, shelters, programs, and health care providers build and sustain strong partnerships.

  • A step-by-step online guide for community health centers on building partnerships with Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault advocacy, addressing violence in health centers, and promoting prevention: IPVHealthPartners.org
  • An online toolkit for health care providers and DV advocates to prepare a clinical practice to address domestic and sexual violence, including screening instruments, sample scripts for providers, patient and provider educational resources: IPVHealth.org.